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Rooney's Foot

  • Key Stage 3
  • Popular Activity
  • Topical

Type: Activity
Learning Strategy: Information retrieval
Topic: Health & fitness

With the world cup fast approaching, news that Wayne Rooney had a fractured foot set all minds to seeking the fastest cure. Speculation and debate about the seriousness of the bone break have filled the recent media. How could his recovery be accelerated? Ideas and discussion have ranged from normal everyday medical procedures to the bizarre, including the use of an oxygen tent. What is a metatarsal? How can it be fixed? And what's the point of the oxygen tent? Students demonstrate their understanding of a scientific text by offering Rooney some good advice.

Published: 18th May 2006
Reviews & Comments: 21

Learning objectives

Students will:
-challenge the common misconception that bones are not alive and learn that it is the supply of glucose to the blood supply in the bone that provides energy for repair.
-develop the skills to evaluate credibility in evidence sources.

Try the activity

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11 - 14 (KS3)
Respiration QCA 8B:
-the reaction in cells between glucose and oxygen
-how the blood transports glucose and oxygen around the body

Running the activity

The whole activity could be used as a hook for a lesson starter, taking approximately 10mins, or could be extended through the challenge of researching the different references on the web about the oxygen tent?

Page 1 sets the task. A picture of the bones in the foot shows the complexity of the metatarsal and a time line shows the recovery period, and the dates of the Eng-er-land World Cup matches. This could be shown as a projected image for pupils to view and discuss on arrival. Page 2 describes the science of how bones repair. The keywords to consider are: respiration, glucose, energy, cell division and blood supply. They need to convince Rooney of the best course of action using facts from the page 2. The template on Page 3. could be used to structure their responses.

Teacher's notes
Rooney's oxygen tent reduced the % of oxygen in the air to stimulate red cell production so that he will be fitter when he is able to resume training. But new bone growth could be stimulated by increasing the blood's oxygen supply. At sea level, haemoglobin is normally saturated with oxygen after a passage through the lungs. To get extra oxygen into the blood you need to add red cells, or dissolve the gas in the plasma. If a pressure chamber is used to raise the pressure to 2000 mmHg, it can produce a 20-fold increase in the normal concentration gradient of oxygen. If the blood supply to the damaged area is compromised, the extra oxygen that dissolves in the plasma helps healing. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment is only available privately and is not covered by medical insurance. Patients sit in the pressure chamber for one or two hours per day. It has been reported to speed bone healing. The opposite effect has been seen in people who smoke. The carbon monoxide they take in reduces the blood's oxygen carrying capacity and their bones take longer to heal. A number of molecular growth factors have been suggested to be activated by the increased oxygen levels which ultimately generate new tissue. After all this though, there are few well controlled studies which state unequivocally that high pressure oxygen treatment is effective.

News links

BBC
This is a good all round account.
The sun
Quotes about the oxygen tent as oxygen rich.
mykindaplace
More detailed information for teachers.
Telegraph
Quotes about the oxygen tent used by Beckham as oxygen reducing.
The altitude centre
Download pdf's of the story from the Sun and Telegraph to compare the styles.
BBC
Excellent images - ideal for the whiteboard.
BBC
A super audio clip about bones to promote listening. It could be played while the register is being checked.
kidshealth.org
A very accessible site describing bones at an appropriate level for year 8.

Reviews & Comments

Write your online review to share your feedback and classroom tips with other teachers. How well does it work, how engaging is it, how did you use it, and how could it be improved?

Rooney's Foot review

Oct 21st, 2012

5 Star

Very good

Reviewer: Sarfraz Shah

Sport & Exercise Science

Jul 31st, 2009

5 Star

Excellent! My students loved this one.....was relevant & contemporary. They were focussed the whole session. Thank you again UPD8 for a brilliant resource.

The class was BTEC Physiology for Sport & Exercise Science Level 3. Links to o2 transport/bones/joints & also Injuries in Health & Safety........I even used it for AS PE Class.

Reviewer: Hazel Butterworth

Ronnies Foot

Jul 13th, 2009

3 Star

Good for top level year 8.

Reviewer: OLUWATOYIN LADITI

Rooney's Foot

Oct 14th, 2008

4 Star

My BTec Healthy Body students enjoyed the activity, particularly as it is true - they found this most fascinating! Most were very surprised and resistant to the idea that lowering the oxygen content could have any benefits and we had a healthy debate as to whether the use of this therapy for anything other than broken bones would constitute cheating.
A useful starting point for other research.

Reviewer: Jennifer Mayer

Rooney's Foot review

Sep 25th, 2007

4 Star

Pupils really enjoyed this activity. It is more suitable for middle to higher level pupils.

Reviewer: sue kennedy

Rooney's foot

Mar 21st, 2007

5 Star

I downloaded this intending to use it with my PRU group but thought it was probably too involved for them. I will revisit it as an activity to do after SATS revision is finished as a fun thing to do

Reviewer: Jennifer Mayer

Rooney's Foot

Dec 31st, 2006

4 Star

The kids really enjoyed this, it really engaged them and they learnt without even realising it, which is always a bonus!

Reviewer: Kim Whiddett

Rooney's Foot

Sep 30th, 2006

5 Star

Great activity, even for less able.

Reviewer: Steve Rhodes

Rooney's foot 17/7/06

Jul 18th, 2006

4 Star

Tried this activity with my y8 and 9 classes (both low ability) during the last week of term. It was a useful way of revising respiration and the circulatory system.

Reviewer: Sarah Lewins

Rooney and year 4

Jul 7th, 2006

5 Star

The Rooney resource adapted perfectly to the year 4 QCA module Moving and Growing. Even at this young age they all knew where the metatarsals were! After completing the unit based on Rooney the children wrote some bullet points to Wayne on how to fix his foot quickly, including nutritional, exercise and rest aspects. A real motivator - some very young and unwilling writers were totally absorbed in the task.

Reviewer: Christina Stiddard

Rooney's Foot

Jun 30th, 2006

5 Star

Teamed with a vidoe on bones this was a perfect lesson. The pupils were really engaged with it and were happy to complete it and share their ideas with the rest of the class.

Reviewer: averill jewell

Rooney's foot

Jun 24th, 2006

5 Star

Have used this resource 3 times - as a starter with Y9 lower ability who are doing a project on fitness - tied in nicely with respiration and what oxygen is used for - and how transported.
Also with Y10 Humans as Organisms - tying together several parts of this module as a different (and to the pupils much more acceptable way) of revising
The final use was as part of a display 'What's science got to do with the world cup?' where I used the first 2 pages but not the pupils activity sheet - have seen lots of pupils stopping to look - attracted by the colourful and easy to access format

Reviewer: sarah longshaw

Rooney's Foot

Jun 24th, 2006

5 Star

I used this with a football mad year 10 class of special needs pupils to tie together several sections of work in module 1 (Humans as organisms) of the AQA entry level certificate. They discussed it enthusiastically and showed much greater awareness of the relevance of science. An excellent and well-timed resource.

Reviewer: Elizabeth Franklin

Rooney's Foot

Jun 18th, 2006

5 Star

A brilliant resource which I used with my Year 8 mixed ability group.It motivated all pupils. They produced some amazing work.

Reviewer: Denise Quinn

Rooney's foot

Jun 14th, 2006

4 Star

What else could I have used the day before the WC started?

A useful exercise, with all sorts of good leaping off points.

It must be good if it motivated me (a football-hating Physics tecaher) to talk about metatrasals!

Reviewer: Stephen Brian

Rooney's Foot

Jun 13th, 2006

5 Star

Have to say that all four of my Y9 pupils from Level 4 up to Level 7 enjoyed this activity. The activity was extended by giving them a named skeleton from Google, identifying how each bone could be broken by a different accident. An interested survey showed that in each set there were more broken bones than dental filings, I have more filings than all the pupils in each set, gosh do I feel old sometimes.

Reviewer: Peter WOOD

Rooney's Foot

Jun 12th, 2006

5 Star

A really engaging activity for my Year 9 low ability group. Someone had the idea of advising Coleen McLoughlin (Rooney's partner) about how she could help him to recover. When they wrote their report the pupils had to word it so that Wayne could easily read and understand it!

Reviewer: Margaret Wellington

Roony's Foot

Jun 6th, 2006

5 Star

This really motivated my weak Year 9's and we are developing the ideas in a further lesson

Reviewer: Kim Knappett

shampoo claims

May 24th, 2006

5 Star

Excellent activity to introduce pupils to enquiry ideas of considering evidence, anomalous results, repeats etc. Followed up by trying to repeat a version of the experiment ourselves.

Reviewer: Michael Corbett

Rooney's foot

May 23rd, 2006

5 Star

Excellent resource. Very easy to differentiate. Pupils really enjoyed learning about the ways that bones heal, especially Rooney's bones as this gave them added interest. A very informative section.

Reviewer: Stephen Palmer

MMR

May 20th, 2006

5 Star

We have used this with year 9's after their SAT's where traditionally we start GCSE work. With the new specifications and emphasis on How science works, this was an excellent activity to get pupils thinking about current issues, interpretation of evidence and scientific controversy.

Reviewer: Sue Humphries